Module 7 Horticultural applications “The case of the Creole Garden: history and cultural aspects”

Last updated: April 12, 2022

Learning Objects

Urban agriculture is developing all over the world. Indeed, as populations are becoming more and more urban, projects to green cities are multiplying.

In Martinique, the practice of the “Creole garden” is rooted in tradition. The Martinican people, even if they live in the city, want to keep this ancestral tradition alive.

Making a Creole garden, even on a very small space is possible. In highly urbanised neighbourhoods, small cultivated areas can be found at the edge of houses or buildings.

The Terres Sainville district is a good example: vegetable gardens are created on “urban wastelands”, i.e. empty spaces between two houses, where a house used to be that was demolished because it was unhealthy.

Creole gardens are therefore interesting to understand when we talk about urban agriculture and green roofs

These empty spaces, which have often become unauthorised dumps, are transformed into food-producing areas. This contributes to the improvement of the living environment and to food autonomy.

The Terres Sainville district is a good example: vegetable gardens are created on “urban wastelands”, i.e. empty spaces between two houses, where a house used to be that was demolished because it was unhealthy.

Creole gardens are therefore interesting to understand when we talk about urban agriculture and green roofs

These empty spaces, which have often become unauthorised dumps, are transformed into food-producing areas. This contributes to the improvement of the living environment and to food autonomy.

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